A Virtual Graduation

On Saturday. May 30, my grandson received his bachelor’s degree from Cleveland State University (CSU) in a virtual graduation ceremony.  For him it was a great achievement and represented long hours of preparation and work.  His degree is in computer science with a minor in mathematics.

 

Graduation!

May 30, many of us will remember, was the date on which Memorial Day used to be celebrated.  I remember some of my parents’ generation called it Decoration Day. That day families went to the cemetery to decorate the graves of the war dead.

For my parent’s generation, the war dead were near and numerous, not theoretical.  World Wars I and II in some way touched every family and Memorial Day was somber, not the beginning of summer as it is now.

Graduations used to come in June, and took place before large happy crowds of people.  This virtual graduation event was certainly the first of its kind for the university.

A Virtual Graduation

My husband and I sat in front of the zoom screen on my computer and listened to remarks by the president of the university, the mayor, the lieutenant governor of Ohio, and several previous CSU graduates. I was able to locate my grandson’s major department on the computer screen.

The names of all computer science graduates marched across the screen individually, with appropriate graduation day background music. When my grandson’s name arrived, we saw a video of him, in cap and gown, looking very happy. He smiled and thanked his parents and grandparents for help and support.

We have attended many graduations, and this was the first one where we heard every speaker and actually saw the face of the graduate. It reminded me of my daughter’s graduation from a small college outside Richmond, VA. Then we sat in folding chairs on a field on a very hot day, quite far from an outdoor stage. Nearby, a level railroad crossing bisected the town.

Amtrak kept its schedule that day.  Fairly frequently, a train came through the town at a slow speed, blowing its whistle all the way. We barely heard any of the speeches, but we did see our daughter at a distance.

My grandson is now a graduate and I’m grateful for the computer and zoom.  We were able to join the family electronically that evening to congratulate him.

Another Graduation Day: Me and Lymphoma

My grandson is not the only member of our family to face some final test results this early summer.  On Thursday, I am scheduled for a mammogram.  Two years ago a mammogram led to a diagnosis of an aggressive type of lymphoma for which I was treated over six months and for which I have undergone numerous lab tests and PET scans.

The doctor?

 

 

While I’m of the age that I may have avoided a mammogram two years ago, for some reason I didn’t.  My radiologist found something funky on the picture and that led to biopsies, CAT scans and further lab tests and scans. After three months the doctors came up with the lymphoma diagnosis.

I can’t say I’m looking forward to the mammogram, nor am I looking forward to a PET scan now scheduled for July. The PET scan is sort of a graduation day for me.  If they find nothing, I will be considered cured with no further tests or medical procedures.

For me, none of this will be virtual.  The tests will be done according to normal procedures and the results will either be good or bad.

 

Graduation, Old People and Old Jokes

As the grandmother of a college graduate, I am an old person.  Here is a story about old people:

“Six retired Floridians were playing poker in the condo clubhouse when Meyerwitz loses $500 on a single hand and drops dead at the table. Showing respect for their fallen partner, the other five continue playing standing up.  Finkelstein looks around and asks, “So, who’s gonna tell his wife?”

They draw straws.  Goldberg picks the short one.  They tell him to be discreet, be gentle, don’t make a bad situation worse.

“Discreet? I’m the most discreet person you’ll ever meet. Discretion is my middle name. Leave it to me.”

Goldberg proceeds to the Meyerwitz apartment and knocks on the door.  The wife answers and asks what he wants.

Goldberg declares, “Your husband just lost $500 and is afraid to come home.”

“Tell him to drop dead,” says the wife!

“I’ll go tell him,” says Goldberg.

 

Social Distancing and Mother’s Day

Mother’s Day in a lock-down requiring social distancing was bound to be different than the norm, but for me it actually wasn’t.  As in most years, I received phone calls and promises of future calls and maybe a future zoom meeting.

My children and grandchildren are busy people. I know they are stuck in their houses and they continue with school and music lessons. In time for Mother’s Day, I received a video of two granddaughters playing piano.  The video showed them individually and I could see their hands hit the keys.  They were socially distanced from everyone when the video was made.  Nobody heard me, but I applauded loudly for each of them, just like a grandmother should.

I received delivered gifts: a box of candy and a bottle of dessert wine from my daughter and her family; a box of candy and flowers from my son and his family.  I did not have direct contact with the delivery man, just as in previous years, but this time I practiced social distancing.

Since Mother’s Day was still “locked down”, the florist called to say he’d be delayed. The good flowers weren’t yet available. Since I wasn’t going anywhere, I thanked him for the call and the information. The flowers arrived two days later and were worth the wait.  Here is a picture (including the box of candy):

 

Mother’s Day Roses and Lilies

 

The roses opened to about six inches in diameter, and a week later, the lilies were still open and wonderful to look at. But they didn’t compare to my outdoor Russian iris:

Russian Iris: No Social Distancing

 

Social Distancing: the New Normal?

We’ve had a warm and wet May and the birds and flowers are loving it. They have no thoughts of masks and barriers and social distancing.  Whenever I go out on the porch there is a jumble of tweets and loud sounds from a mass of small birds. I’m sure many of them are a lot closer to me than six feet.

We have been advised by the local authorities and some local businesses that we should get ready to go back to work, shop and live in the world again.  This will be different from before, if everyone takes these rules seriously.  For a haircut, there will be no shampoo; I will have to arrive with my hair already shampooed.  There will be no children or pets allowed in the place. I will have to wash my hands before being issued into wherever the hairdresser will be located.

Social Distancing and Health Care

The Cleveland Clinic sent me their directive on their “new normal.” They are ready to resume in person healthcare services, but they encourage patients to use “virtual” visits. The notice states that with a virtual visit the patient can see a provider right away, or schedule an appointment for routine care using the smartphone.

I’ve already had one virtual appointment with my doctor and it was hardly a medical exam.  There were no tests, and because I couldn’t figure out how to turn on my camera, the doctor could only speak to me. He saw nothing.  We both agreed to schedule a regular in-person visit in September. Likewise, my dentist will see me in October.  Maybe over the years I’ve been overdoing it with annual doctor’s visits and semi-annual dentist visits.  Routine care doesn’t have to be constant care.

As with my hairdresser, the Cleveland Clinic will not permit patients to bring anyone with them for an appointment.  On the other hand, children, elderly patients, those with special needs and those having surgery requiring an overnight stay may bring a guest.  That probably accounts for a large percentage of the non-routine procedures done at the clinic. The notice states that the clinic is among the safest places in healthcare.

A few years ago, after I was released from a hospital stay, I was taken by a nurse to the entrance of the hospital in a wheel chair.  As I got out of the wheel chair, the nurse said to me, “Take care, and don’t come back.” We both knew that hospitals are unsafe places.

Do the masks protect everyone? People now own them and wear them, but if you can’t see someone’s face, how can you trust him or her?

Insecure? It’s Happened Before.

I remember a Woody Allen story. Feeling insecure, Woody moved to an apartment building in the city because it employed a doorman for protection.  On his second night, when he returned to the building, Woody was mugged by the doorman.

Let me end this with a Henny Youngman story about doctors:

A guy says to a doctor, “I’m having trouble with my love life.”

The doctor says, “Take off twenty pounds and run ten miles a day for two weeks.” Two weeks later, the guy calls the doctor, “Doctor, I took off twenty pounds and I’ve been running ten miles a day.”

“How’s your love life now?”

“I don’t know. I’m 140 miles away!”