Washington’s Shadow is my fourth historical novel and probably the last.  All of my books focus on  American nation building in our early history.  Generally early American history is not being taught in elementary schools and later grades.

I’ll be addressing the process by which I produce these books at a discussion panel at the Williamsburg Book Festival on Saturday, October 5. Nation building is a subject that has always interested me. Virtually everything I write discusses some aspect of it. The people who build the nation have to be strong enough to understand they can’t do everything alone, by themselves.  They have to risk danger in moving ahead, but they have to communicate with each other. They have to build coalitions and marriages.  Nations, in my way of thinking, always begin with families and extended families and how they learn to deal with individual members and each other.  Washington’s Shadow is about how Washington visualized the country and how the people who followed him interpreted the idea of nation building in his image.

 

I’ve spent a good part of my working life in and out of government jobs.  I’ve worked as staff in the US House of Representatives and  the US Senate. I held positions in the US Treasury Department, and the US Commerce Department. I worked for several  Washington law firms and lobbies. I know how our government is supposed to work.

When I retired and moved to Williamsburg, Virginia, I met many people from outside Washington DC. I was surprised by how little most people knew about the practical working origins of the US government.  More shocking was how little actual research had been done to explain and understand our history. There are very few serious books that explain the political institutions of the early colonies.  There are publications, fictional and non-fictional, about Pocahontas, colonists starving, and the exploits of famous pirates.  For the most part these are designed to entertain children and give little historical context.

What Americans Know About Nation Building and their History

On retirement I took a position as a volunteer docent in the museum at Jamestown Settlement. Jamestown as a city no longer exists.  Jamestown Settlement, a modern park, is situated near the James River. It includes a gallery,  a model fort, an Indian village, and a port holding three ships. The facility is designed to explain the founding and development of the first English settlement in the new world. I learned there that most people have heard of Pocahontas. However, many believe the three ships that arrived in Jamestown in 1607 were the Nina, the Pinta, and Santa Maria.  The next Virginian most people can identify is George Washington, who lived a hundred and fifty years later.

Visitors  coming to Williamsburg from Washington DC are often surprised by the familiarity of the old government buildings and institutions of colonial Virginia. Most people don’t know that Jefferson, who designed the US Capitol, previously served in Virginia’s House of Burgesses, as did George Washington. When they learn some facts, they begin to understand that our government didn’t somehow fall out of the sky. The American government was the product of long experience and practice.  The US Constitution was written by people who knew what they were trying to do.

Nation Building and the Founding Fathers? Who Built the Nation?

The Wealth of Jamestown, The Wealth of Virginia, and Blackbeard’s Legacy are three short novels to the early 1700s. The books describe men and women, young and old, native Americans and settlers, the educated and the uneducated living  almost a hundred years before the US Declaration of Independence. The characters are not European; they are American. They are engaged in politics and commerce on a grand scale.  Blackbeard, the king of international trade in his day, was as much a Founding Father as Thomas Jefferson. Each of these books required at least two year’s research into original documents and obscure writings and sources.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Washington’s Shadow tells of people living at the edge of a wilderness in a time soon after the Revolutionary War. These people knew Washington. They are a later generation of Americans. They moved west to build towns and communities. They faced away from Europe with its wars and dynasties, a movement of people that began in 1607.  Though taking place in 1810, Washington’s Shadow is the latest chapter in my fictional explanation of nation-building, American style.